Tag Archive | "luts"

Weight Loss Increases Libido in Obese Men with Type 2 Diabetes


A small Australian clinical study showed that sexual function improved significantly and quickly in obese men with type 2 diabetes after weight loss with reduced-calorie diets.  For 31 men who lost five percent to ten percent of their body weight in eight weeks, erectile function, sexual desire, and urinary symptoms all improved significantly.  According to an article published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, metabolic parameters, including blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profile, also responded favorably to either a low-calorie, meal-replacement diet or a high protein-low carbohydrate diet.

The improvements were maintained during a year of follow-up.  Joan Khoo, MRCP, of Changi General Hospital in Singapore, and Australian co-authors wrote, “Further improvements during weight maintenance, using a high-protein low-fat diet, suggest that both nutrient quality and caloric restriction contribute to these benefits.”  Although the favorable effect of weight loss on sexual function is not new, this study may be the first to demonstrate an impact on sexual desire.

Another important finding was weight loss’ apparently favorable effect on systemic inflammation.  Obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which are associated with each other and with systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

Rapid weight loss through dieting can improve erectile dysfunction and LUTS. Previous studies also have shown improved endothelial function and reduced inflammation after weight loss, especially for people who lose at least 10 percent of body weight.  Not much data had been collected regarding the influence of macronutrient composition on associations between weight loss, endothelial function, systemic inflammation, sexual function, and LUTS in obese men.

All 31 men involved in the study had type 2 diabetes, a body mass index greater than 30, and a waist circumference of at least 102cm.  They were randomized to two dietary plans.  The first plan was a liquid meal-replacement consumed twice daily and one small, nutritionally balanced meal, providing a total energy of about 900 kcal/day (low-calorie diet).  The second plan was a low-fat, low-carbohydrate diet designed to reduce energy intake by about 600 kcal/day.

The first assessment occurred after eight weeks, and follow-up continued for an additional 44 weeks.  The participants who opted to stay in the study for long-term follow-up consumed the high-protein diet during the follow-up.

Men in the low-calorie diet group had about ten percent reduction in mean body weight and waist circumference at eight weeks, as compared with about five percent among men assigned to the high-protein diet.  Weight loss at eight weeks averaged 9.5kg with the low-calorie diet and 5.4 kg with the high-protein diet, both of which were statistically significant.

In general, inflammatory markers decreased significantly in the high-protein group but not the low-calorie group, but the men assigned to the high-protein diet had higher baseline levels of the markers.  About half of the men remained in the study for the entire 52 weeks. Of those who did, improvements were either maintained or increased.

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Alternative Procedure is Available for Treating Enlarged Prostate


According to Dr. Joao Martins Pisco, lead author of a study presented on March 29, 2011 at the annual meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology in Chicago, a new treatment called prostatic artery embolization (PAE) may be used in certain patients with prostates larger than 60 cubic centimeters and who have serious lower urinary tract symptoms and weakened urinary stream.

Enlarged prostate, also known as benign prostate hyperplasia, is a non-cancerous condition that affects millions of aging men.  This condition occurs when the prostate gland slowly enlarges and presses on the uretha, which constricts the flow of urine.  It is characterized by unpleasant symptoms including a weak or slow urine flow, a constant and urgent need to urinate, not being able to fully empty the bladder, and having to get up repeatedly at night to urinate.

The surgery that has generally been used to treat enlarged prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), is used for men whose prostates are smaller than 60 to 80 cubic centimeters.  The procedure requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay.

In contrast, there is no size limitation for PAE, which requires only local anesthesia.  Researchers say that the procedure lowers the risk of other side effects including blood loss and retrograde ejaculation, which happens when semen leaks into the bladder.  PAE can also be an outpatient procedure.

According to the study, PAE helped the majority of 67 patients who received the treatment.  Sixty-six of the men who had not responded to medications experienced improvements in symptoms and a reduction in prostate volume.  After nine months, none of these men experienced sexual dysfunction, and a quarter continued to report improvements.

PAE, however, remains controversial and few doctors are trained in this procedure.  Authors of the study reported that there was not a great an improvement in improved flow rate of urine in patients who underwent PAE, which would indicate the performance of the bladder and urethra, as those who underwent TURP.

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Research Study for Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) Due To Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)


Are you a man age 50 or older?

Do you have to urinate frequently during the day and at night?

Do you have trouble urinating?

Are these and other urinary problems interfering with your life and your relationships?

If you answered “yes” to the above questions, you may be a candidate for the L.I.F.T. Study.

The L.I.F.T. Study is an FDA approved research study to evaluate the UroLift system to support a premarketing application to FDA. Its purpose is to determine the safety and effectiveness of the UroLift system for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The study is being conducted at urology practices throughout the U.S., in Canada and in Australia.

BPH is a non cancerous condition that causes the prostate to enlarge as men age. When the enlarged prostate presses on the urethra, it can cause bothersome urinary symptoms. The UroLift System is a minimally invasive approach to treating BPH that lifts/holds the enlarged prostate tissue out of the way so it no longer blocks the urethra. There is no cutting, heating or removal of prostate tissue. The goal of UroLift system treatment is to relieve symptoms so you can get back to your life and resume your daily activities.

The UroLift system is an investigational device as such is limited by Federal Law to investigational use only.

To find out more about L.I.F.T. Study and UroLift system treatment and study locations, go to www.neotract.com.

Posted in Chronic Prostatitis, Prostate Inflammation, Prostate TreatmentComments (3)


 

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