Categorized | Feature, Prostate Health

Brisk Walking Slows Down Prostate Cancer Progression

A recent study at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the Harvard School of Public Health found that an association between brisk walking and lowered risk of prostate cancer progression in a study of 1,455 men in the U.S. diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer.

The research team found that men who walked briskly at least at three miles per hour for at least three hours each week after diagnosis were about sixty percent less likely to develop biochemical markers of cancer recurrence or less likely to need a second round of prostate cancer treatment.  The study was published in the journal Cancer Research.

This new finding complements an earlier study published by UCSF’s June Chan, ScD, and collaborators at the Harvard School of Public Health showing that physical activity after diagnosis could reduce disease-related mortality in a distinct population of men with prostate cancer.  The recent study by Erin Richman, ScD, a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF is the first to focus on the effect of physical activity after diagnosis on early indications of disease progression, such as rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood levels.

An advantage of this study is the focus on early recurrence of prostate cancer, which occurs before men may experience painful symptoms of prostate cancer metastases, a frequent cause for men to decrease their usual physical activity. Additionally, the researchers reported that the benefit of physical activity was independent of the participants’ age at diagnosis, type of treatment and clinical features.  This work was funded by the Department of Defense, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, Abbott Labs, and through a National Institutes of Health training grant.

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November 2011
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